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Films By Osamu Tezuka

Adachi-Ga Hara continues the afore-mentioned 'mutative approach' to story-telllng. This time, the original manga is based on a traditional Non play called Kurozuka which mines tho rich vein of Japanese witch mythology. Tezuka sets Adachi on a desolate asteroid and plays out the involving ... Read more
The TV series that started it all, from the infiltra­tion of Japanese style into Western TV anima­tion to the tradition of cartoon robots still strong in Japanese amine today. The success of Astro Boy in and outside Japan provided the cor­nerstone for the animation industry there and ... Read more
A string of gags based on 20s-style animation and the self-reflexiveness of Windsor McCay's surreal comic strips from the same period. While the gags are familiar, the extent to which Tezuka pushes the medium's break-down is quite extreme. Tezuka himself considered that if this film Is booed off by ... Read more
A companion piece of sorts to Mermaid, Drop utilizes similar brush and wash backgrounds, but stylizes its central protagonist in broader caricature. Tezuka made this film in one week as a demonstration to his staff at Mushi that experimental anime could be done quickly and economically. ... Read more
A tour de force of technique and the imagination. Influenced by the experimental hungarian animation, The Fly, Jumping utilizes the point-of-view gag to convey a breathtaking view of how powerful a child's imagination can be. Apart from the technical virtuosity of the animation ( containing over ... Read more
The 3rd TV series Tezuka created with Mushi, Kimba was the first colour anime series made in Japan. Highly memorable for Australian kids who saw it during its early 70s broadcast, Kimba con­tained a certain harshness and sadness atypical of animation then and still now It is based on the Zen ... Read more
The second major work Tezuka produced as a reflection on the art, craft and history of animation (the first being Pictures at an Exhibition). Legend of the Forest is formally dedicated to walt Disney, and conveys Tezuka's ongoing theme of the importance and value of life in all its forms. Told ... Read more
If Princess Knight sounds wiid, Marvelous Melmo is all the more so because Tezuka's intentions were that this TV series function as sex educa­tion for young children. Never released in the west-not surpnsingly-the series follows the exploits of Melmo who is given a bottle of trans­formative ... Read more
A whimsical tale of impossible love rendered in severely simplistic stick-figure technique. Tezuka explored a vast range of styles and tech­niques in his animation which he could not do with his manga. The music score for Mermaid is the first of many done by Isao Tomita who later went on to ... Read more
One of Tezuka's last shorts. Utilizing a sketchy realist mode of depiction , it is a cautionary tale of armament set against a backdrop of samurai lore and iconography. Towards the end of his life, Tezuka was specially outspoken on a variety of global issues. His cautionary address, though, exists ... Read more
Tezuka's second major animation short. Pictures at an Exhibition is Tezuka's inspired response to Disney's Fantasia. Much of Disney's works did not reach Japan until the late 40s, and the advances that Disney displayed in Snow White and Fantasia hit Japanese animators with great force. Tezuka has ... Read more
Acknowledged as the first anime for girls (and indirectly leading to some of the most mind-boggling gender-specific girls titles {shojo manga & anime} which have proliferated in Japan over the proceeding 30 years), Princess Knight is a truly confounding tale. Set in a lurid fantasy-Europe, which ... Read more
Another of the whimsical gag shorts, this one about the futuristic society of machines at the eternal service of the isolated human being. The repeated ' thank you - come again' phrase orients the film as a wry comment on the polite rituals of mass consumption in contemporary Japan. ... Read more
Technically referred to as the Remake Of Astro Boy this series features a karaoke disco version of the theme (true to the Japanese theme but with English words). Many changes are evident in this slicker version but the themes are largely intact. The main shift is in the focus on the robotics of ... Read more
Tezuka's work can loosely be divided into three distinct modes of production: his manga—where he could elaborate his ideas with total control, his TV series and manga derived features-which often transformed his manga ideas, and shorts designed for international film festivals-where he could ... Read more
The original manga on which the Green Cat has been regarded as a pioneering science fiction work. The resultant anime is a typically quirky mix of Disney-esque character stylings with involving and ponderous narrative thread. Once again, Tezuka clashes generic traits and iconography to produce ... Read more
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